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  • #16
    Are they serious?

    The Chinese have used toad poison as an expectorant, heart stimulant and as a diuretic. It has also been used as a remedy for toothache and sinusitis.

    "The skin, organs and gut are also used for traditional medicines.

    And I thought over imbibing in Bourbon was bad.

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    • #17

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      • #18
        Canetoads have also been known to be a significant source of food for humans in their native environment; cane toads are cooked by skinning them and removing the internal organs (including the poisonous glands), then roasting them. It has been said they are like chicken except with a drier taste.

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        • #19
          This thread is about as disgusting as the creature itself.
          Apparently Dettol applied with a spray is very effective, they don't stink after it.
          Being in NSW, we don't see any (yet) to try it, but that was the advice given by NT inhabitants.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by moas View Post
            This thread is about as disgusting as the creature itself.
            Apparently Dettol applied with a spray is very effective, they don't stink after it.
            Being in NSW, we don't see any (yet) to try it, but that was the advice given by NT inhabitants.
            Yep, works a treat. Don't know about the stink though, I think that's a bit wide of the mark. If they struggle far enough to get into a garden and hide before they die, you certainly know there is something dead around, in a day or so. Give them a quick spray across the back of the head and back area and it kills them pretty quickly, although I'm guilty of nearly drowning them with the stuff. Due to the cost of dettol, I water it down to about 50/50 and it still does the job.
            It's amazing to watch the crows pick them apart. They've obviously cottoned on to the poison doing some serious damage, so they turn them over and and disembowel them, making sure they don't eat the nasty bits.

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            • #21
              There are natural predators of Cane Toads in Australia they include dragonfly nymphs, water beetles, Saw-shelled Turtles and Keelback Snakes which eat the tadpoles. Keelbacks also eat young toads; laboratory tests have shown that they can tolerate low levels of toad toxins. Young or adult Cane Toads are eaten by wolf spiders, freshwater crayfish, Estuarine Crocodile, crows, White-faced Heron, kites, Bush Stone-curlew, Tawny Frogmouth, Water Rat and the Giant White-tailed Rat. Some predators eat only the toad's tongue, or attack its belly and eat only the mildly poisonous internal organs.

              Thinking the problem may be that Female toads lay 8,000 to 35,000 eggs at a time and may produce two clutches a year.

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              • #22
                For a while they seemed to have disappeared in my area and then one night there seemed to be dozens of tiny babies all over my backyard. Now they are half grown and I'm doing my best to drive over everyone I see on the road.

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                • #23
                  Never forget my 1st drive through a paddock at night out the back of Maroochydore. Arrived during the day to a bbq, had an evening of frivolity, then went over to the car, turned the lights on and saw what looked like little meerkats everywhere. Had fun driving out of the paddock then...

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                  • #24
                    If ya come across these in your pond or in your travels remove them from the water and bake them in the sun, they are toad eggs the strings are continuous and usually over a meter in length,the jelly strings contains small black eggs held in the jelly.

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                    • #25
                      As for Australian native frogs - All Australian frogs lay their eggs in clumps or spreading mats rather than strings. They might be clumps under water attached to a rock or vegetation, a lump of foam (like frothed up laundry soap) on the water's surface, or as a film which spreads across the surface. ie

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                      • #26
                        Hey David and Jonboy check out around the 40:15 mark of the below with sound

                        It's an educational doco, but that segment is the highlight..................LOL

                        http://Cane Toads: An Unnatural History.
                        Last edited by MGH66; 12-02-2016, 07:27 AM.

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                        • #27
                          This is becoming my favourite thread. Havent seen a toad for ages. They must be all moving to Perth. Always got my golf club ready.

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                          • #28
                            Did ya like the reference to the RX4

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                            • #29
                              There is a sequel, Cane Toads the Conquest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PxxLtiAYdw

                              Some funny stuff in this as well.

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                              • #30
                                Adults toads average 1015 cm (3.95.9 in) in length; the largest recorded specimen weighed 2.65 kg (5.8 lb) with a length of 38 cm (15 in) from snout to vent.

                                Imagine a beast like this hopping around ya back yard, golf club may not be the preferred weapon of choice.

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